We all want to be wilw

Okay, so the blog is out. Best I can do for the time being — it will be a couple of months before I have the bread for an actual hosting service, but it’s on the list.

You’re right, though — this site exists mostly for the sake of getting my rant on. It’s not a good medium for communication. And the last thing the internet needs is another blog. Or another web site.

I still have high hopes for Diaspora. The alternate choice would be Drupal, but the latter is too limiting in the event Diaspora becomes available and is halfway decent.

This matters because given the option, I’d as soon be one node in a larger network than an independent web site. Think Facebook, but running on a bunch of privately operated servers instead of some corporation’s server farm.  But with a “log in using your Facebook account” button.

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  • Comments (7)
    • jane
    • June 29th, 2010

    blog is quite enough for the time being – you are a busy hedgehog dad .. plus, yes, it all costs money … 😦

    • jane
    • June 29th, 2010

    and blog is good if people get round to commenting comments on mine are pretty thin on the ground, and usually just a nice little slap on the back ..

    • Max Bell
    • June 29th, 2010

    It needs to be done. Facebook may be poorly designed, but for the most part, it’s easy to use.

    Back when I first started getting pissed off about FB, I noticed a lot of people whose reaction was summarized as “Get over it — you don’t have any privacy”. Which is great for people like me — if I wanted to, I could be invisible on the internet. But for the typical user?

    The problem is that technical expertise is a limited commodity. Those that have it are in very limited supply.

    And hosting isn’t really a huge expense — for what I need, the actual cost is about $210/year. I’ll have that by the time I’m ready to do anything anyway. Supposedly Diaspora is due out in September; it’s going to take me that long to come up with a clever domain name. hostingthing.com was too long to be useful.

    • Laroquod
    • June 29th, 2010

    Saying the last thing the world needs is another blog, is like saying the last it needs is another human. True, but… fuck it, here you are. Keep on, man! And agree on Diaspora — let’s see whether this can pan out into something that will shape the *real* worldwide social network. I love what people write on their blogs, but after you get the initial link from them, it’s just structurally hard to keep up with comments. Yeah you can opt into email notifications but every blog handles this differently and even the issue of email security aside, it’s just not pleasingly efficient in any way to be dealing with dozens of different styles of being notified of things. It exacts an extra tax of inefficiency on a process that is already not the cheapest, time-investment-wise (loading somebody’s individualised blogging/website template, a different one for every person).

      • Max Bell
      • June 29th, 2010

      When you start a blog, or a website, or even back when you ran BBS’, you were basically making everything about you; there’s an element of vanity to it. I was embarrassed to find out people were talking about it when I quit facebook; I figured putting up a notification for a day was enough. I’m more of a commenter than a web-master, though, although I can certainly put together sites.

      I found a web site a few minutes ago (http://www.diaspora-news.net/) that gave me some technical insight into Diaspora, though, which dashed any hopes I had of using it to run a web site. I’d been thinking of it (as I’m sure many have) as another CMS in a box; that’s not it at all, though. Apparently, it’s more like a client — you put it on a flash drive, for example, configure it, and then it stores all your content — profile, pictures, etc. — instead of posting them to flickr, maintaining a profile on facebook/twitter etc. — I’m not seeing any suggestion that it’s set up to manage multiple users at all. In fact, one post says that multi-user Disaspora systems are something that’s not going to be developed until a later release.

      So I’m back to Drupal, and trying to make it behave like a forum system, and encouraging people to actually use Diaspora themselves when it becomes available.

      Still disappointing, though.

    • Laroquod
    • June 30th, 2010

    The amount of vanity is starting a blog or website is kind of proportional to how many are doing it. When only leading lights were doing it, then maybe it would be putting yourself on their level, but when everybody’s doing it, there isn’t much vanity left in it, because you are only putting yourself on everybody else’s level. Certainly I don’t think it’s vain simply out of the desire to express oneself: that isn’t vanity, although it is ego of a kind. A good kind.

    From your description, I’m concerned as to how Diaspora will handle notifications, as I still think that is the main, key thing that made Facebook so useful (it definitely wasn’t Farmville, e.g.) — centralised notification system. If I can get notified of what everyone connected to me using Diaspora is doing efficiently with very lightweight pageloads, that’s a win, everything else is a fail.

    Not sure exactly whether that meets your definitions of ‘multi-user system’ or not.

      • Max Bell
      • June 30th, 2010

      Yeah, what Diaspora is going to be is still confusing to me. If it’s not intended as a CMS, why did the creators delete their Facebook accounts? Still, my impression is that it’s more intended as a social networking client than a social networking system in and of itself.

      The down side of setting a fund raising target of 10k and collecting almost a quarter million — they’ve put all of their time updating their blog into talking about money and thanking people. I should really go back and finish watching the video on that blog…

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